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Home / World / IDS condemns punishment of British public schoolboy in Singapore, but people are safer there

IDS condemns punishment of British public schoolboy in Singapore, but people are safer there



  Jayden Moodie, 14, died in an attack

  Jayden Moodie, 14, died in an attack

Jayden Moodie, 1

4, died in a "horrible" attack when three men rammed a number car in his moped and stabbed him several times

The news that London-born Ye Ming Yuen will be flogged for drug offenses, committed in Singapore, rightly affecting most people as archaic and barbaric. Next to his prison sentence of 20 years, the twenty-nine will be stripped, tied to a wooden table and beaten 24 times.

Yesterday's criticism from Foreign Minister Jeremy Hunt is both welcome and justified. These penalties belong to the dark ages.

However, despite its unacceptable barbarism, it is still a sign of how seriously they take the question of drug damage. It also shows how weak and fragmented our policy and application is.

In fact, the cold-blooded murder of Jayden Moodie, 14, was a reminder of the destruction and chaos that permeated our society.

The Mail on Sunday & # 39; s revelation that the judges are giving adolescents convicted of dealing with class A drugs a "wrist slap" rather than serious prison terms, has highlighted a serious failure – what fuels the chaos that is transforming the bands of our country into the paradise of gangsters.

Young teenagers are attracted, then trapped, in gangs – and in some cases killed in cold blood on our streets.

It is absolutely regrettable that Singapore uses such antiquated physical punishment, and yet we must bear in mind that teenagers are not stabbed to death on the streets of Singapore.

Indeed, the city's harsh approach to crime and punishment has resulted in it being ranked as the second most secure city in the world, after Tokyo.

And, in any other city with a clear attitude to drug policy, like Singapore, many less teenagers are killed in their streets.

Other countries much closer to home, such as Sweden, show a zero tolerance approach focused on prevention and treatment, which we can learn from. And learn that we must Violent crime – and often drug-related – is back on the rise in the United Kingdom.

Much of the London knife epidemic last year, which saw the murder rate in the capital rise to its highest level for a decade, was linked to an increase in drug gang feuds. It is estimated that the gangs are responsible for at least half of all knife crimes with injuries, 60% of the shootings and 29% of reported child sexual exploitation.

  Much of the knife epidemic in London last year, which saw the murder rate in the capital increase at its highest level for a decade, has been linked to an increase in drug gang feuds

  Much of the London knife epidemic last year, which saw the homicide rate in the capital increase at its highest level for a decade, was linked to an increase in drug gang feuds

Much of the London knife epidemic last year, which saw the murder rate in the capital increase at its highest level for a decade has been linked to an increase in drug gang feuds

it is time for our approach to combating violent crime to have changed. First of all, we must settle our police activities. We must not be afraid to use & # 39; stop and search & # 39; – despite the many controversies surrounding it.

It is true that concerns about racism are often cited to stop discrediting and to look for imperfect and inflated statistics. But what should worry most critics is that young people aged 15 to 24 who are not white have on average six times more likely to be fatally stabbed or stabbed than young people of the same age who were white. These are devastating statistics.

Combined with police activities, intelligence-minded, stop-and-search police activities are a powerful weapon in combating the scourge of knife crime. And the communities want it. The survey of Londoners by the Center for Social Justice last summer found support for power at over 90%, with more than two-thirds being retained even in non-white communities.

But stopping and looking is not enough alone. Our criminal justice system is one of the oldest and best in the world, but it does not mean that we can not significantly improve the way we treat criminals.

While there should be little appetite for imitating the barbaric ruling in Singapore, we also know that many of the warnings and fines inflicted on minor drug offenses do not help here.

We must do more to reform what is often a useless waste of time for the courts, the police and the transgressors.

this idea, currently being investigated by the Center for Social Justice – which I helped to create – is a practice used in Sweden; where the offender is given the choice to take the criminal road or the path of rehabilitation.

For example, the use of a drug awareness course, similar to a speed awareness course. Those found with small amounts of cannabis should pay to spend time in an addiction treatment center. It would give them a horrible look at the potential consequences of their actions. Vitally, we have to get the kids out of the clutches of the gangs and schools.

  Jayden's brutal murder last week highlights the crisis we face. Now is the time to take action to regain control of our roads to save more young lives

  Jayden's brutal murder last week highlights the crisis we are facing. Now is the time to take action to regain control of our roads to save more young lives

Jayden's brutal murder last week highlights the crisis we are facing. Now is the time to take action to regain control of our roads to save other young lives

Finally, and above all, we have to go back to the root of much of this problem and seize the nettle on a very thorny issue: collapse of the family.

For some reason, my colleagues in Parliament and Westminster thinkers are afraid of tackling the issue that Britain is a world leader. Well, normal people are not.

The scourge of fatherlessness is at the root of violent crimes, since young people seek identity and belonging to gangs when they do not find it at home.

And then, of course, we must amend the political condemnation, so that our courts take the matter seriously.

We can not continue with a situation in which the police do their best to remove criminals from our streets and yet are disappointed by the judicial system that delivers slaps on the wrist to the most serious offenders.

As long as our courts start issuing sentences that reflect the seriousness of the crime committed, more young blood will continue to pour into our streets.

Jayden's brutal murder last week highlights the crisis we face. Now is the time to take action to regain control of our roads to save other young lives.

The father of the British public schoolchild who suffered 24 lashes in Singapore for drug trafficking begs for mercy

by Jonathan Bucks

The parents of a former public schoolchild in front of a flogging and a conviction 20 years in Singapore asked that the sentence be canceled on the basis of reduced liability.

In a very emotional interview with The Mail on Sunday, London-born father Ye Ming Yuen, 29, claimed that his son suffered a "nervous breakdown" before his arrest, adding: " The court must therefore consider Ming not guilty for reduced liability. "

Ming, a former student of £ 37,000- at a year's Westminster School, was sentenced to 24 club shots for "repeated traffic"

  The former public schoolchild Ye Ming Yuen, 29, stands facing a flogging and 20 years in prison in Singapore

  Former public Scolaro Ye Ming Yuen, 29, is facing a whipping and 20 years in prison in Singapore

The former public schoolchild Ye Ming Yuen, 29 years old , is facing a flogging and 20 years in prison in Singapore

His father Alex Yuen, 70, said: "I think he turned to drugs because he was subjected to a lot of pressure at the private school.

" It was very competitive and pushed the students a lot. I think he felt under pressure, so instead he went with the wrong crowd. He did many things because he wanted acceptance. Instead of realizing his talents, being recognized and accepted for what he could achieve, he became a slave to the pleasure of other people and that's why he did the things he did. "

However he added that his son's use of drugs did not begin

Last night, Mr. Yuen spoke of his fears that his son could be violently assaulted in Changi prison.

" If I asked, I would be surprised if I had received a message Tomorrow, next month, which was found stabbed in prison, I would obviously say no. It's amazing that it was not, "he said, and the former mother of the top club DJ Melina Yuen added in tears:" We did not even have the chance to say goodbye properly. There is no family support and it is so far away.

  A prison officer demonstrates the canning procedure on a mannequin inside the Singapore Changi Prison. Michael Fay was fired for committing vandalism in Singapore

  A prison officer demonstrates the boxing procedure on a mannequin inside the Singapore Changi Prison. Michael Fay was fired for committing vandalism in Singapore

A prison officer demonstrates the boxing procedure on a mannequin inside the Singapore Changi Prison. Michael Fay was fired for committing vandalism in Singapore

"He has a very brave face but, like his mother, he speaks to me and I know how he feels"

"He's very worried. "

" Singapore refused me to come in, so I was not able to see my son out there in jail, "said his father, a business man." It's really a good boy but he's crazy. "

" The reason he received this monstrous phrase is because the prosecution tried to make it clear that he was not respectful and had no respect for the law.

"Both Ming and I know he has committed a crime, he can not understand how he got such a long sentence." Ming was convicted of several drug offenses, including 69g of cannabis and another of 60g.

Initially he had faced the death penalty but capital had fallen because the net weight of the drugs involved was less than 500 g.

His punishment will be inflicted by a "trained dog" who teaches how to cause the greatest possible pain.

Ming will be stripped naked and tied to a large wooden easel, then her buttocks will be whipped 24 times with a 4-foot long cane stick.

The case triggered a diplomatic rift between the United Kingdom and Singapore, which has some of the hardest drug laws in the world. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt and his officials have made it clear that "they strongly oppose the use of corporal punishment".

The Foreign Office said that "he is assisting a British man and his family since his arrest in Singapore in 2016".

Soft touch Britain

by Martin Beckford

The soft sentences transmitted by judges to drug dealers and violent criminals are driving the violence of the gang gripping Britain.

A government-funded report tells how young drug dealers and thugs armed with knives were released with a "slap on the wrist", sending the message that "the consequences of drug trafficking and violence are minimal".

In a shocking exhibition of Wild West Britain, the study also shows how:

l The bosses of an unscrupulous family now turn to middle-class children to sell drugs for them;

They keep their soldiers' eye with mobile phone tracking apps

lealeal offer "two-for-o's" offers and "prizes" for get more people related to heroin and crack cocaine

Children are being sold to Xanax, an anti-anxiety drug that causes addiction to "calm the nerves" before the exams.

lParents are invited to children for knives.

The findings were sent to parliamentarians by the Unit of Violence and Vulnerability, established to deal with the growing problem of the "County Lines" gangs that send young people to sell drugs in provincial towns. [19659005] the report was submitted to the Commission's Internal Affairs Committee on Serious Violence, launched last year as the fear of a wild Britain grew, where cracks, robberies and murders became common in cities and towns.

There were 134 murders in London alone during 2018, becoming the bloodiest year for a decade, and there were five more victims from the new year, including 14-year-old Jayden Moodie.

Last night, the former minister of children Tim Loughton, who sits on the committee, said: "We have to get serious about repressing the County Lines, which means sending a very clear message that there will be severe penalties for those involved in this horrid spiral of violence

treating these teenagers as victims, the courts are sending mixed messages. "

The wave of violence has been linked to the number of policemen who have fallen to the lowest level since 1981 after nearly a decade of budget cuts.

And a new commitment from prisons minister Rory Stewart to ban prison sentences of less than six months will likely increase concerns over summary sentences.

The report makes it clear that Britain is now plagued by a "new type of crime" linking "street gangs", drug traffickers and organized crime groups "that run an extremely" violent "activity but "It is very profitable." And warns that there are widespread concerns about how the criminal justice system is tackling the problem.

Written tests include the hard-line: "When young people go through the justice system they only get a slap on the wrist. "[19659005] Says the workers of the young offending team (YOT) mention a 15-year-old captured with large amounts of Class A drugs – as many as 30 cocaine crack masses – who were punished only for the minor offense of possession rather than The study continues: "Regular criminals are not given prison sentences, a practice exacerbated by a lack of consistency in the conviction for knife crime.

"This sends a message to young people that the consequences of drug dealing and violence are minimal and acts as an incentive for old traders to continue using teenagers aged 14 and 15 years." Warns: "In fact, workers of the YOT have no sanction that they can invoke as a warning to young people, the lack of which threatens to undermine their work. "

There is a rising wave of antisocial behavior that is not put in place in question, leading the (very) young people to think that they can do anything they want with impunity. "

The key element of the new crime involves predicting vulnerable people.The traders find new markets, so they educate the children as young as 14 years old to act as mules and "subject" them to a criminal life through debt.

They are aimed particularly at adolescents who have been expelled from school and sent to the Reference Units of alumni, who are becoming "the area for gang rivalries" and "a crime recruitment arena".

Band leaders also use apps like "Find My iPhone" to monitor children who work for them.

Others use young people to recycle money through their bank accounts.

According to the researchers, one of the reasons for an increase in youth violence could be "ruthless and desperate adolescents" who commit robberies to pay off their debts.

In this world, knives and drug dealers are seen as normal activities "with stabs seen as a way to send a warning, which leads to" children carrying weapons for protection ".

Violence is also fueled by social media while gangs publish music videos on YouTube or threaten their rivals.

After conducting hundreds of interviews with youth workers and drug support groups, the team believes that more and more people in the UK are taking crack cocaine and heroin , including women and young people

drug gangs use "price wars" to control their markets, also offering "two-for-one" and "prize-giving" offers to win over new customers.

And children of the middle class always use Xanax to calm the nerves before the exams "while the band members themselves take it" before the acts of violence ".

In some areas including Brighton, the study says middle-class children are targeted while gangs become "more creative" in their recruitment methods. 19659005] Experts want the grooming of young people to sell drugs to be made a specific offense that "incurs severe penalties", while more should be done to counteract the old dealers who drive expensive cars that recruit teenagers on the street [19659005] those who are put behind bars are able to continue to "operate their lines" because of the "free availability of mobile phones inside the prison", and when the rival gangs are housed in the same prison, their feuds become more violent. The report also warns that social workers struggle to protect adolescents involved in "bondage and debt trapping" because the system is designed only to protect neglected or abused children from their families.

It is said that a worker YOT "had to fight for the case of a child who had a gun to be accepted as negligence"

In addition, it can be difficult to help families to help "when the money of the activities of County Lines they could pay household bills ".

The report Says that in some areas parents are taught "how to look for weapons and drugs" and even tell them "how to do daily research".

The evidence obtained by The Mail on Sunday confirms the suspicion of the unit against young drug dealers

A snapshot of last year's judicial cases revealed at least 15 examples of judges distributing judgments suspended to teenagers and young adults convicted of possession with intent to provide, which could cede a seven-year prison sentence.

The number of convictions for drug offenses dropped from 82,561 in 2008 to 65,677 last year, according to data from the Ministry of Justice. And for the specific crime of possession with the intent to provide, only 6,947 of the 13,186 people sentenced in 2017 received an immediate prison sentence.

Overall, the number of children entering the criminal justice system has fallen by an incredible 85% in the last decade and the number of blocked persons has fallen by 74% – even when the number of knife crimes salesmen broke out.

Last night, Liberal Democrat spokesman for business affairs Ed Davey said: "When young people are arrested in the early years, boys will ring the alarm bells.

" If we intervene to help these young people on a different path, there is a chance to fight that we can reduce crime and undermine these criminal gangs. "


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